New Directions in Just-War Theory Authored by: Dr. J. T. Reiner. July 30, 2018

One of the major developments in international law since World War II is the growth of human rights law dedicated to ensuring the protection of individuals from violence wherever they are, including from their own state. Tracking such changes, in recent decades, just-war theory has evolved from its traditional focus on state sovereignty in the direction of a rights-based approach that treats just wars as a form of global law enforcement. This monograph provides a survey of these developments, focusing on the increased scope for humanitarian intervention, principles of justice after war, and on the question of the responsibility of combatants for assessing the justice of their military's cause. It concludes by considering the call for strengthening international institutions and training programs in military ethics.

U.S. Landpower in the South China Sea Authored by: LTC Clarence J Bouchat (USAF, Ret). July 07, 2017

U.S. landpower is an essential, but often overlooked, element of national power in semi-enclosed maritime environments like the South China Sea. This monograph gives U.S. policymakers a better understanding of the role of the U.S. Army, Marine Corps, and Special Operations Forces (SOF) in the region through potential combat operations employing wide area defense and maneuver; deterrence through forward presence and peacetime operations; and security engagement with landpower-dominant allies, partners, and competitors in the region. Landpower’s capabilities are also essential for direct support of the air and sea services and other government organization’s success when operating in this theater in direct support of U.S. national interests.

Peace & Stability Journal, Volume 8 Issue 2 Authored by: PKSOI Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute. August 07, 2018

The Peace and Stability Journal contains relevant and current articles and reports on ongoing Peace & Stability Operations (P&SO) events and emerging P&SO doctrine and concepts. April 18th through the 20th the Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute (PKSOI) hosted its 12th annual Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Training and Education Workshop (PSOTEW) at the U.S. Army War College at Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania. This year’s workshop provided a forum for trainers, educators, planners and practitioners from U.S. and international governmental and non-governmental organizations, military organizations, military and civilian peace and stability training centers, and academic institutions to share current challenges and best practices toward improving civilian and military teaming efforts in the realm of peace and stability operations training and education.

Strategic Insights: Learning from the Military's Weinstein Moment Authored by: Dr Leonard Wong. July 31, 2018

In early October 2017, The New York Times reported multiple allegations of sexual harassment against powerful Hollywood producer, Harvey Weinstein. A few days later, The New Yorker revealed more allegations against the movie executive to include accusations of sexual assault and rape. After more than 80 women stepped forward to accuse Weinstein of sexual abuse, Weinstein was fired from his production company, ostracized by the film industry, and arrested and charged with rape and other offenses.

Current Russia Military Affairs Edited by: Dr John R Deni. July 27, 2018

What are the key strategic objectives of Russian foreign and security policy? How has Russian operational planning been affected by experiences in Georgia, Ukraine, and elsewhere in recent years? What international or domestic factors most influence Russian force modernization? These and other questions were at the top of the agenda on May 1, 2018, as the U.S. Army War College's Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) and the U.S. European Command (EUCOM) gathered some of the best minds from academia, think tanks, and government to discuss current Russian military affairs The objective of the invite-only workshop was to inform EUCOM's efforts vis-à-vis Russia, and to bridge the gap between leading scholarly work and the practice of U.S. security policy. This compendium of executive summaries from each of the featured workshop speakers provides critical analysis and important recommendations for policy-makers and other practitioners of American foreign policy.

Supporting, Non-Standard Mission Role: U.S. Operations in Liberia, 2014–2015, that Enabled the U.S. and UN Response to the EVD Outbreak Authored by: Ms. Alix J. Boucher. Edited by: Doctor Raymond A Millen. January 18, 2018


Operation UNITED ASSISTANCE (OUA), which deployed to Liberia between September 2014 and June 2015, provides an example of how a Joint Force can support a lead federal agency (LFA), in this case the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and other interagency and international partners to end a raging epidemic of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD). This EVD outbreak began in late 2013, when Emile Ouamouno, a two year old from Meliandou, a village in Guinea, close to the border with Liberia and Sierra Leone, died of a hemorrhagic fever.1 Soon after, many of his relatives and their connections, who lived across the region, also became ill and died. In March 2014, a team from the Institut Pasteur in France confirmed that the hemorrhagic fever spreading through the region was EVD. By then, more than 2,400 people had died from the disease. By the time the epidemic ended, in Liberia alone, 15,227 cases of EVD had been confirmed through laboratory tests and 11,310 people had died.

Strategic Insights: The Assad Regime and Chemical Weapons Authored by: Dr Robert J Bunker. May 18, 2018

On April 7, 2018, insurgents and civilians in a rebel enclave in Douma, east of Damascus, Syria, were subjected to a chemical weapons attack during an offensive conducted by Assad regime and allied Russian and Iranian-linked ground forces. At least 42 individuals were reported to have been killed in the attack due to suffocation—primarily in their homes—with more than 500 additional individuals seeking medical attention. Local reports from the encircled enclave suggest that during the late afternoon and evening hours, Assad regime helicopters dropped two barrel bombs containing a substance with signatures consistent with that of chlorine.

What Should the U.S. Army Learn From History? Recovery From a Strategy Deficit Authored by: Dr Colin S Gray. July 26, 2017

Does history repeat itself? This monograph clearly answers “no,” firmly. However, it does not argue that an absence of repetition in the sense of analogy means that history can have no utility for the soldier today. This monograph argues for a “historical parallelism,” in place of shaky or false analogy. The past, even the distant and ancient past, provides evidence of the potency of lasting virtues of good conduct. This monograph concludes by offering four recommendations: 1) Behave prudently. 2) Remember the concept of the great stream of time. 3) Do not forget that war nearly always is a gamble. 4) War should only be waged with strategic sense.

Strategic Insights: Thinking About Catastrophe: The Army in a Nuclear Armed World Authored by: Dr Steven Metz. December 14, 2015

Nothing is more important to American security than nuclear weapons. Despite all the fretting over terrorism, hybrid threats, and conventional aggression, only nuclear weapons can threaten the existence of the United States and destroy the global economy. This is certainly not news to American policymakers and military strategists: they have recognized the centrality of nuclear weapons at least since the Soviets detonated their first atomic bomb in 1949. But so far, U.S. strategy has focused almost exclusively on deterring attacks from a hostile nuclear state, preventing unfriendly nations from acquiring nuclear weapons and, after the break up of the Soviet Union, keeping nuclear weapons out of the hands of terrorists.

Strategic Insights: U.S.-China Relations: Avoiding the Traps Authored by: Prof John F Troxell. July 19, 2017

Much has been written about the rise of China and the tensions that this has put on the international system. The potential for conflict between the United States and China can be compared to the Peloponnesian War, as told by the ancient historian Thucydides, and the inevitability of that war because of Sparta’s fear of a rising Athens. There is no doubt that the rise of China has generated, if not fear, at least significant consternation on the part of the United States and our Pacific allies.